Navajos began weaving sometime before Spaniards came to the new…

Written by at September 22, 2014

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Navajos began weaving sometime before Spaniards came to the new world. http://bit.ly/1rfgbZc

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The original shirt wearers earned the right to wear War Shirts…

Written by at September 22, 2014

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The original shirt wearers earned the right to wear War Shirts through great acts of bravery and deeds that were incorporated into the designs. http://bit.ly/WYcswu 

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It’s your day off. Why not make some Frybread? Here is the…

Written by at September 22, 2014

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It’s your day off. Why not make some Frybread? Here is the Traditional Native American Recipes of Breads http://bit.ly/ytdntk 

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Indian Spear Uses The spears of the Native Americans had many…

Written by at September 22, 2014

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Indian Spear Uses

The spears of the Native Americans had many uses. They were all handmade and often were used as a symbol of status to other tribes. Most spears were made out of long pieces of wood and tipped with sharpened metal, bone or stone. The tip material varied between tribes based on their region of the country. The Indians were very proud of their spears and treasured and respected them.

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The American Revolutionary War: Northern theater after Saratoga,…

Written by at September 22, 2014

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The American Revolutionary War: Northern theater after Saratoga, 1778–81

French entry into the war had changed British strategy, and Clinton abandoned Philadelphia to reinforce New York City, now vulnerable to French naval power. Washington shadowed Clinton on his withdrawal through New Jersey and attacked him at Monmouth on June 28, 1778. The battle was tactically inconclusive but Clinton successfully disengaged and continued his retreat to New York.

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The American Revolutionary War: Northern and Western…

Written by at September 22, 2014

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The American Revolutionary War: Northern and Western frontier

West of the Appalachian Mountains and along the border with Quebec, the American Revolutionary War was an “Indian War”. Most Native Americans supported the British. Like the Iroquois Confederacy, tribes such as the Shawnee split into factions, and the Chickamauga split off from the rest of the Cherokee over differences regarding peace with the Americans.

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 Reclaiming Our Children Through Food  Our histories are…

Written by at September 22, 2014

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 Reclaiming Our Children Through Food

 Our histories are bursting with examples of how tribal nations have fought and sacrificed for continued existence in the face of powerful forces that sought to eliminate and assimilate American Indians. We have survived through federal policies of extermination to forced relocation to assimilation.


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The American Revolutionary War: Virginia, 1781 Cornwallis…

Written by at September 22, 2014

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The American Revolutionary War: Virginia, 1781

Cornwallis proceeded from Wilmington north into Virginia, on the grounds that Virginia needed to be subdued in order to hold the southern colonies. Earlier, in January 1781, a small British raiding force under Benedict Arnold had landed there, and began moving through the countryside, destroying supply depots, mills, and other economic targets. In February, General Washington dispatched General Lafayette to counter Arnold, later also sending General Anthony Wayne.

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The American Revolutionary War: Britain vs. France, Spain, and…

Written by at September 22, 2014

The American Revolutionary War: Britain vs. France, Spain, and…



The American Revolutionary War: Britain vs. France, Spain, and Holland 1778–1783

Naval conflict When the war began, the British had overwhelming naval superiority over the American colonists. The Royal Navy had over 100 ships of the line and many frigates and smaller craft, although this fleet was old and in poor condition, a situation that would be blamed on Lord Sandwich, the First Lord of the Admiralty. During the first three years of the war, the Royal Navy was primarily used to transport troops for land operations and to protect commercial shipping.

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The American Revolutionary War: Treaty of Paris In London, as…

Written by at September 22, 2014

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The American Revolutionary War: Treaty of Paris

In London, as political support for the war plummeted after Yorktown, British Prime Minister Lord North resigned in March 1782. In April 1782, the Commons voted to end the war in America. Preliminary peace articles were signed in Paris at the end of November 1782; the formal end of the war did not occur until the Treaty of Paris (for the U.S.) and the Treaties of Versailles (for the other Allies) were signed on September 3, 1783.

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The American Revolutionary War: American armies and…

Written by at September 22, 2014

The American Revolutionary War: American armies and…



The American Revolutionary War: American armies and militias

When the war began, the 13 colonies lacked a professional army or navy. Each colony sponsored local militia. Militiamen were lightly armed, had little training, and usually did not have uniforms. Their units served for only a few weeks or months at a time, were reluctant to travel far from home and thus were unavailable for extended operations, and lacked the training and discipline of soldiers with more experience.

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The American Revolutionary War: British armies and…

Written by at September 22, 2014

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The American Revolutionary War: British armies and auxiliaries

Loyalists Historians have estimated that approximately 40 to 45 percent of the colonists supported the rebellion, while 15 to 20 percent remained loyal to the Crown. The rest attempted to remain neutral and kept a low profile.
At least 25,000 Loyalists fought on the side of the British. Thousands served in the Royal Navy. On land, Loyalist forces fought alongside the British in most battles in North America. Many Loyalists fought in partisan units, especially in the Southern theater.


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Citizenship for Native American Veterans During World War I,…

Written by at September 22, 2014

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Citizenship for Native American Veterans

During World War I, about 9,000 American Indians served in the armed services. They fought and died in defense of a nation that still denied most of them the right to participate in the political process. Congress, as a result, enacted legislation on November 6, 1919, granting citizenship to Indian veterans of World War I who were not yet citizens.


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The American Revolutionary War: The Americans The Americans…

Written by at September 22, 2014

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The American Revolutionary War: The Americans

The Americans began the war with significant disadvantages compared to the British. They had no national government, no national army or navy, no financial system, no banks, no established credit, and no functioning government departments, such as a treasury. The Congress tried to handle administrative affairs through legislative committees, which proved inefficient.


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The Symbols of the Aztec Sunstone The Aztec sunstone depicts the…

Written by at September 22, 2014

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The Symbols of the Aztec Sunstone

The Aztec sunstone depicts the symbols of the Aztec solar calendar, as well as symbols of the four epochs of mythology. The Aztec calendar was divided into two cycles: the solar calendar and the sacred calendar. Every 52 years these two differing cycles would align, causing Aztec holy men to conduct the New Fire Festival to avoid disaster during this event, known as Xiuhmolpilli, or “bundling of years.”

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Arrowheads Found in Montana Many different kinds of arrowheads…

Written by at September 22, 2014

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Arrowheads Found in Montana

Many different kinds of arrowheads were excavated in Montana. The only thing archaeologists seem to be sure of is that they were intermingled with living material like bone, flesh and wood. Carbon dating helps scientists determine the age of living matter and, therefore, estimate the time period in which the arrowheads were used. Some arrowheads were used as long ago as the early late Prehistoric period.

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The Difference Between Mohican & Mohegan According to Native…

Written by at September 22, 2014

The Difference Between Mohican & Mohegan
According to Native…



The Difference Between Mohican & Mohegan

According to Native American oral history, Mohicans are descendants of the original Mohegan people who crossed the Bering Strait and the nearby Pacific Ocean to settle into modern-day North America. Due to famine, the Mohegan and another tribe, the Pequot, went east and settled in the Algonquian woodlands as one people known as the Delaware or Lenni Lenape.

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Modoc Tribe Games The Modoc were a branch of the Klamath people…

Written by at September 22, 2014

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Modoc Tribe Games

The Modoc were a branch of the Klamath people of Oregon, and the two groups often warred with each other. The Modoc originally inhabited areas of southern Oregon and northern California, but after the Modoc War of 1872-1873 many of them were resettled in Oklahoma. Today there is a small Modoc reservation in Oklahoma, with a larger group still in Oregon.


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Saving Native Languages and Culture in Mexico With Computer…

Written by at September 22, 2014

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Saving Native Languages and Culture in Mexico With Computer Games

Indigenous children in Mexico can now learn their mother tongues with specialized computer games, helping to prevent the further loss of those languages across the country.

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Seneca Presidential Candidate Named to Smithsonian Repatriation…

Written by at September 22, 2014

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Seneca Presidential Candidate Named to Smithsonian Repatriation Committee

Darlene Miller, running to become the first woman president of the Seneca Nation of Indians, is one of only seven members of the national Repatriation Review Committee of the Smithsonian Institution.

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Making the Grad: Cornell Hosts Graduate Horizons for Native…

Written by at September 22, 2014

Making the Grad: Cornell Hosts Graduate Horizons for Native…



Making the Grad: Cornell Hosts Graduate Horizons for Native Students

The 2014 Graduate Horizons summer workshop, held at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, targeted college students and graduates who are looking to apply to graduate/professional programs. That wasn’t the only focus though. This year, Graduate Horizons focused on preparing Native American, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian and First Nations students for the competitive admissions process. About 60 Native students attended the four-day intensive workshop, held in July.



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Jon Tester: Bill protects Special Diabetes Program for Indians

Written by at September 22, 2014

Sen. Jon Tester (D-Montana) explains why he introduced S.2830, a bill to provide permanent funding for the Special Diabetes Program for Indians:

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Tim Giago: An independent candidate awakens ‘Party’ zombies

Written by at September 22, 2014

When you register as an Independent in South Dakota you are made to feel as if you are from Iowa or Wyoming and you are trying to slip into this state to vote.

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Hear These Fluent Speakers Sing Choctaw Hymns

Written by at September 21, 2014

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Chickasaw.TV made this lovely video of fluent speakers singing “The Gospel” from a collection of Choctaw hymns. This took me right back to my childhood, sitting with my grandparents in …

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Guess Who’s Back for Project Runway: All Stars?

Written by at September 21, 2014

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Taos designer Patricia Michaels has been chosen to come back and compete in Project Runway: All Stars! Fourteen of the most talented “Project Runway” designers return to compete in the …

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