How Would You Respond If You Couldn’t Wear This at Your Graduation? Dress Code Won’t Allow Moccasins – Native American Articles – PowWows.com…

Written by at August 30, 2016

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Did you hear about this girl’s struggle for her moccasins to be accepted as approved footwear for her high school graduation ceremony? The dress code for graduation was to be …

The post How Would You Respond If You Couldn’t Wear This at Your Graduation? Dress Code Won’t Allow Moccasins appeared first on PowWows.com – Native American Pow Wows.

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The Deadly Waters in the Northern First Nations

Written by at August 30, 2016

Imagine every morning having to set a full pot of tap water on your stove and continuing to wait for it to boil just to be abl

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Ya’ah’tee, Jacoby Ellsbury! Yankees Star Talks Navajo Tacos And More!

Written by at August 30, 2016

Much is known about New York Yankees centerfielder Jacoby Ellsbury.

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Tribal Tech Makes Inc. 5000 for Third Consecutive Year

Written by at August 30, 2016

Tribal Tech, LLC came in at No. 817 on Inc. magazine’s 2016 ranking of the nation’s fastest-growing private companies. This was the third year in a row that Inc….

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Massive Navajo Corruption Case: Judge Sentences 11

Written by at August 30, 2016

A Window Rock, Arizona district court judge last week handed down sentences to 11 defendants for the criminal misuse of…

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The Ties That Bind: Part 1

Written by at August 30, 2016

A few days ago I posted a short blurb on my Facebook page reminding Haudenosaunee people that our Confederacy has a long standing treaty relationship with the Sioux Nations….

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The Unfulfilled Promises of JFK: He Vowed a New Frontier for Natives

Written by at August 30, 2016

Editor’s note: Voters this year will elect the 45th president of the United States.

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Hemp: The Next Big Cash Crop for Tribes?

Written by at August 30, 2016

In 1794, President George Washington said: “Make the most you can of the Indian hemp seed and sow it everywhere!”…

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School starts at #NoDAPL camp as pipeline resistance digs in for long haul

Written by at August 29, 2016

The Defenders of the Water School held its first classes at the Camp of the Sacred Stones as the #NoDAPL movement continues.

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Quapaw Tribe hosts groundbreaking for meat processing facility

Written by at August 29, 2016

The $1 million plant will process beef, bison, and pork products and serve as a training facility for universities.

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Senate Committee on Indian Affairs schedules hearing on four bills

Written by at August 29, 2016

Bills to recognize the Lumbee Tribe, promote economic development and place land in trust for the Tule River Tribe are on the agenda.

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2016 Football Pickem Contests – Native American Articles – PowWows.com – Native American Pow Wows

Written by at August 29, 2016

2016 Football Pickem Contests – Native American Articles – PowWows.com – Native American Pow Wows

Calling all football fans! We have sponsoring pick’em contest for the upcoming college football season and the NFL! College Football In order to join the group, just go to College …

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Watch Tonight: Standing Rock Chairman David Archambault II Speaks With MSNBC’s Lawrence O’Donnell

Written by at August 29, 2016

Last week MSNBC host and commentator Lawrence O’Donnell baldly stated, “This nation was founded on genocide,” in a passionate statement supporting the water protectors along the…

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Trial slated to begin for death of Mohegan Tribe casino employee

Written by at August 29, 2016

A driver for a bus company that took patrons to Mohegan Sun is accused of striking and killing a casino employee.

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Frog Lake First Nation proposes gaming development in Alberta

Written by at August 29, 2016

Plans call for a casino, hotel, conference center and a Western Hockey League arena at a 140-acre site in Lloydminster.

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Registration Still Open for AMERIND Risk 2016 Institute, Host Hotel Sold Out

Written by at August 29, 2016

SANTA ANA PUEBLO, New Mexico— Registration remains open for the 2016 AMERIND Risk Institute, but Sandia Resort & Casino, the host hotel, is sold out….

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Brian Fraser: Don’t let tribes open casinos anywhere they want

Written by at August 29, 2016

It’s a simple question: Should the Coquille Tribe be allowed to build and operate a Class II casino?

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Sec. Jewell and Obama Administration Racing Clock on Indigenous Issues

Written by at August 29, 2016

Interior Department Secretary Sally Jewell, who in her three-and-a-half years in office has visited tribes across the U…

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Vandalism Endangers Three Rivers Petroglyph Site in New Mexico

Written by at August 29, 2016

Joan Price has spent the last two decades studying the Jornada Mogollon rock art at …

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Pii Paash Concerned About Reclaimed Water on Gila River Land

Written by at August 29, 2016

A deal to trade Colorado River water for reclaimed water to irrigate fields on the Gila River Indian Community has been the source of a months-long battle between the Pii Paash…

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For Adults Only

Written by at August 29, 2016

I was up north of the rez in Denver taking care of some stuff I needed to get done when I ran into an acquaintance whose mother I knew from long ago….

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Celebrate the Mothers of Wisdom – 4th Annual American Indian Heritage Day in Texas – Native American Articles – PowWows.com – Native American…

Written by at August 28, 2016

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DALLAS, TX, September 24 — American Indian Heritage Day in Texas (AIHDT), a 501(c) 3 non-profit, is set to host the 4th Annual American Indian Heritage Day in Texas event …

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Panel: Depression screening for kids could prevent suicides

Written by at August 28, 2016

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HELENA, Mont. (AP) – A panel seeking ways to fix Montana’s highest-in-the-nation suicide rate is recommending mandatory depression screening of all schoolchildren beginning at age 11 and programs teaching coping skills to kids as young as 6.Preventing suicide and lifting the stigma of depression is a slow process that will require a cultural shift that begins in Montana schools, Karl Rosston, the state Department of Public Health and Human Services’ suicide prevention coordinator, told a legislative committee Friday.“This is the place where we really want to make an impact,” said Rosston, who is also a member of the Suicide Mortality Review Team. “We need to start at an earlier and earlier age to give them coping and resiliency skills so they can handle life.”Montana’s suicide rate is more than double the national average, and the rate of children between the ages of 10 and 17 who kill themselves is nearly triple the national rate

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Project trains educators to teach Native American curriculum

Written by at August 28, 2016

MOUNT VERNON, Wash. (AP) – Cedar weaving – be it baskets, vests or hats – is not only a process, but an art.For some in the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community, it’s an art that’s passed down from one generation to the next.On a recent Wednesday morning, teachers and principals from the La Conner and Concrete school districts tried their hands at weaving thin, moistened cedar strands.It was harder than it looked, said La Conner Elementary School Principal Beverly Bowen.Later, the educators took a journey in one of the tribe’s traditional canoes, reported the Skagit Valley Herald. “(It’s) understanding us from our perspective,” Swinomish Chairman Brian Cladoosby said.The lesson was part of a four-day teachers training session that is partnering Swinomish tribal leaders, faculty from Western Washington University’s Woodring College of Education and Huxley College of the Environment, and educators from the La Conner and Concrete school districts for a project called “Science and the Swinomish.”The project is made possible thanks to a $200,000 grant from the Washington Achievement Council. The goal of the project is to give teachers in those districts a better understanding of Swinomish – and Native American – culture so they have a strong foundation from which to teach their students the state-mandated Since Time Immemorial curriculum.The curriculum, which is designed to enhance what students learn about Washington’s 29 federally-recognized tribes, became a requirement after the 2015 Legislative session.“It’s trying to make everybody better at their job,” said former La Conner School District Superintendent Tim Bruce, who is now an assistant professor at Woodring’s Educational Administration Program.During the yearlong project, teachers from both school districts will gain firsthand knowledge of locally relevant and culturally important issues in science, water use and tideland impacts.Students from both districts will learn about the Skagit River watershed and the importance the ecosystem has to the tribe.“All those things that are involved with the culture,” Bruce said. “And of course, all of us in the Skagit Valley.”Not only will students get to spend time in the classrooms of the other district, the teachers will, too.“I’m excited about the fact that my teachers as well as my principals will have the opportunity to collaborate,” Concrete School District Superintendent Barbara Hawkings said. “As a small district, we don’t have that opportunity like other districts do.”The project emphasizes the Since Time Immemorial curriculum, but also complies with the new Next Generation Science Standards, Bruce said.“The whole goal was to take the kids and get them out into the field, and get their hands dirty, their feet wet, learning about the environment,” Bruce said. “And how we need to take care of that environment to provide a quality of life not only for us but for future generations.”After the year, the findings and curricula will be uploaded to a digital library, where educators throughout the country will be able to access them, Bruce said.The Since Time Immemorial curriculum allows districts some flexibility in what they teach, and they are encouraged to draw from their neighboring tribes.“We’re still here,” said Larry Campbell, Swinomish tribal historic preservation officer

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High prow canoe part of the Chinook family heritage

Written by at August 28, 2016

ASTORIA, Ore. (AP) – Outside the visitor’s center at Lewis and Clark National Historical Park, a historically accurate Chinook canoe is back on display after being fully repaired last year.The Okulam canoe shows park visitors the most popular type of canoe used by the Chinook tribe for more than two centuries, reported The Daily Astorian (http://bit.ly/2bT3QJz). The style is known as a “high prow,” and is designed for the ocean and high waves. “This canoe was really made to resemble a canoe at the time of Lewis and Clark,” Tony Johnson, chairman of the Chinook Indian Nation, said during a talk in Astoria last winter.Johnson, a master canoe carver, restored Okulam from January 2015 to May, when it returned to the park in time for this summer. Since it was built 15 years ago, cracks in Okulam started to expand and the canoe began to unravel. Part of the reason Okulam fell into disrepair is because it dried out on land, rather than being used regularly in the water.Johnson began constructing the canoe in 2001, and worked on it at the park for visitors to watch and learn. Okulam originally went on display in 2003, after a naming ceremony.Okulam means “Sound of the Ocean,” or “Spit Belly,” the name of a gluttonous creature in Chinook culture.The canoe was carved from a Western red cedar log

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