Jeffrey Gibson ~ Choctaw – Cherokee

Written by at December 22, 2014

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Jeffrey A. Gibson (born March 31, 1972) is a Choctaw-Cherokee painter and sculptor.

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Native American stories of bear hunting

Written by at December 22, 2014

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The Native American people are well known for their bear hunting techniques and are sometimes even called masters at the process.

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Enoch Kelly Haney ~ Seminole

Written by at December 22, 2014

Enoch Kelly Haney ~ Seminole

Enoch Kelly Haney (born November 12, 1940) is an American politician and internationally recognized Native American artist from Oklahoma, He served as principal chief of the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma from 2005 until 2009, and was previously a member of the Oklahoma Legislature. He was also a candidate for the office of Governor of Oklahoma.

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Grand Canyon Lodging

Written by at December 22, 2014

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After deciding to embark on a vacation to the Grand Canyon, one must find a place to stay while visiting the Arizona National Landmark.

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Flag of Inuit The native people of the Nunavut territory in…

Written by at December 22, 2014

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Flag of Inuit

The native people of the Nunavut territory in Canada are called Inuit, which is an Inuktitut term that means “people”. The Inuit have been living in Nunavut, which means “our land”, for thousands of years, and presently, they make up about 85% of the total number of people living in the territory. Other than Nunavut, the Inuit can also be found in various parts of Canada, Alaska, and Greenland.

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Pottery of Anasazi The Anasazi, which means “Ancient Ones”, are…

Written by at December 22, 2014

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Pottery of Anasazi

The Anasazi, which means “Ancient Ones”, are thought to have been ancestors of the Pueblo Indians. They settled in the Four Corners; between the states of Utah, New Mexico, Colorado and Arizona. Settlement can be traced back to around 200 AD through 1300 AD. The Anasazi were wandering hunters who lived this type of lifestyle until around 6000 B.C. During the last B.C. centuries, the Anasazi began maize horticulture, supplementing their food gathering, and this became a large role in the economy.

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Kokopelli Tattoos & Designs There are very few Native…

Written by at December 22, 2014

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Kokopelli Tattoos & Designs

There are very few Native American symbols that are as familiar to Westerners as that of the Kokopelli. This hunched, dancing prankster with wild hair is often considered cute for tourists and he has become synonymous with states like Nevada and Arizona, where the tribes that created the Kokopelli symbol originally settled.

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Frank Day ~ Maidu Early life Frank Day was born on February 24,…

Written by at December 22, 2014

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Frank Day ~ Maidu

Early life Frank Day was born on February 24, 1902 in Berry Creek, California. His grandfather was Big Bill Day and his father was Twoboe. His father was a leader in the Bald Rock Konkow Maidu. Growing up, he attended Berry Creek Public Schools, then Greenville Indian School, and Bacone College in Muscogee, Oklahoma. He primarily lived in Sacramento, California. After his father died in 1922, Day “became something of a vagabond.”


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Feathers of Indian Indian Feathers are often found in Native…

Written by at December 22, 2014

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Feathers of Indian

Indian Feathers are often found in Native American headdresses; however they are also used as decorative items. Sometimes they are tied into locks of hair and other times they are worn on a head band. Feathers are used for prayer as well as in dream catchers and bows and arrows. A lot of work goes into creating these beautiful decorative feathers.

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Drum Beats of Native American Drum beats were an important part…

Written by at December 22, 2014

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Drum Beats of Native American

Drum beats were an important part of any Indian celebration. They were also used to communicate long distances. However most of their significance took place during the powwows. Powwows could be held for a variety of reasons both to make significant and important council decisions and also to celebrate traditional holidays or other significant events for a tribe.


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Hock E Aye VI ~ Southern Cheyenne Edgar Heap of Birds (Cheyenne…

Written by at December 22, 2014

Hock E Aye VI ~ Southern Cheyenne
Edgar Heap of Birds (Cheyenne…



Hock E Aye VI ~ Southern Cheyenne

Edgar Heap of Birds (Cheyenne name: Hock E Aye VI) is a multi-disciplinary artist. His art contributions include public art messages, large scale drawings, Neuf Series acrylic paintings, prints, and monumental porcelain enamel on steel outdoor sculpture.
He is Southern Cheyenne and enrolled in the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes.

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Dresses of Indian Dresses played a prominent role in American…

Written by at December 22, 2014

Dresses of Indian
Dresses played a prominent role in American…



Dresses of Indian

Dresses played a prominent role in American Indian life, with most Indian women providing clothing for their families. Dresses weren’t mere fashion items-they reflected an Indian woman’s identity and showcased her artistic abilities. National Museum of the American Indian features extensive information on Indian dresses, connecting history to the present-day stories of Native American women. American.gov also gives an overview of Indian dresses.

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Sharron Ahtone Harjo ~ Kiowa Marcelle Sharron Ahtone Harjo (born…

Written by at December 22, 2014

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Sharron Ahtone Harjo ~ Kiowa

Marcelle Sharron Ahtone Harjo (born 6 Jan 1945) is a Kiowa painter from Oklahoma. Her Kiowa name, Sain-Tah-Oodie translated to “Killed With a Blunted Arrow.” She and Virginia Stroud were instrumental in the revival of ledger art, a Plains Indian narrative pictorial style on Western supports, such as paper or canvas

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Canyon de Chelly National Monument Canyon de Chelly (pronounced…

Written by at December 22, 2014

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Canyon de Chelly National Monument

Canyon de Chelly (pronounced de-shay), located in northeastern Arizona, is a spectacular national monument covering more than 84,000 acres that is both a geological wonder and a historical treasure trove.
The area includes ruins from more than 1,500 years of Native American history, from the ancient Anaszai tribes to the current landholders, the Navajo nation.


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Albert Harjo ~ Creek Albert Harjo (born September 25, 1937, deep…

Written by at December 22, 2014

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Albert Harjo ~ Creek

Albert Harjo (born September 25, 1937, deep within the Muscogee (Creek) Nation in the rural area of Hanna, Oklahoma), is fullblood Muscogee. Albert attended Jones Academy, Hartshorne, Oklahoma then later Chilocco Indian Agricultural School, just north of Ponca City, Oklahoma. After graduating from Chilocco, Albert enlisted and served in the United States Marine Corps.

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Crater Lake National Park Crater Lake is the deepest lake in the…

Written by at December 22, 2014

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Crater Lake National Park

Crater Lake is the deepest lake in the US. The lake is located in Southern Oregon, in the Cascade Mountains. It was formed when Mt. Mazama collapsed in 7,700 B.C. The remaining crater filled with water and is now a national park. The area is sacred to the Klamath tribe, who uses the crater for their vision quest rituals.


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American Indian Palomino Horses As well-known for its beauty as…

Written by at December 22, 2014

American Indian Palomino Horses
As well-known for its beauty as…



American Indian Palomino Horses

As well-known for its beauty as its speed and endurance, the Palomino refers horses that are characterized by their golden color and their pure white mane and tail. The origin of the Palomino will likely never be known, but tales of the gold and ivory horse can be seen in even the most ancient of folklore. Many horsemen are in accord that the Palomino horse is a descendant of both the Arab and the Barb varieties.

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Reaction mixed to Oneidas’ new Chittenango casino: What…

Written by at December 22, 2014

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Reaction mixed to Oneidas’ new Chittenango casino: What are they saying?

The Oneidas’ decision to open a $20 million casino in Chittenango is a “brilliant” strategic move that will set them up as a formidable competitor against the proposed casino in Tyre, the owner of Vernon Downs said Sunday.


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Oneida Indian Nation plans to open Oz-themed casino in…

Written by at December 22, 2014

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Oneida Indian Nation plans to open Oz-themed casino in Chittenango

As New York State opens the door to more casinos, the Oneida Indian Nation is spreading its wings as well. Nation leaders announced plans for a new $20-million casino in Chittenango, with a Wizard of Oz theme.
Renderings show a 67,000 square foot facility with more than 430 slot machines and a bingo hall with seats for 500 players. Visitors will have a couple of dining options, a bar, and a store.

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Oneida Indian Nation Announces 2015 Plan for New…

Written by at December 22, 2014

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Oneida Indian Nation Announces 2015 Plan for New “Oz” Themed Casino

The Oneida Indian Nation, owner of the renowned Turning Stone Resort Casino in Verona, today announced plans to expand its Upstate New York operations with a new $20 million, 67,000 square foot casino in the Village of Chittenango.
Paying homage to the community’s identity as the birthplace of L. Frank Baum, author of “Wonderful Wizard of Oz,” Yellow Brick Road Casino will feature more than 430 Vegas-style cash slot machines, a 500 seat bingo hall, two casual dining options, a country-western bar, and a general store.

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Oneida Indian Nation opening new casino in Central New York The…

Written by at December 22, 2014

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Oneida Indian Nation opening new casino in Central New York

The Oneida Indian Nation will open a $20 million casino in Chittenango in 2015, expanding its gaming empire as New York welcomes its first non-Indian casinos.
Oneida Indian officials say they don’t need approvals from any governments to launch the Yellow Brick Road Casino, which will have 436 Vegas-style slot machines and a Bingo hall in Tops Chittenago Plaza on Route 5, 14 miles east of downtown Syracuse.

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Benjamin Harjo, Jr. ~ Absentee Shawnee-Seminol Background Harjo…

Written by at December 22, 2014

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Benjamin Harjo, Jr. ~ Absentee Shawnee-Seminol

Background Harjo is half-Seminole and half-Shawnee and is enrolled in the Absentee Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma. Harjo’s father was the late Benjamin Harjo, Sr., a full blood Seminole. Harjo’s mother, Viola Harjo, lives in Byng, Oklahoma. Viola’s father was William F. Harjo, who graduated from Chilocco Indian School in 1939. Viola married Benjamin Harjo’s stepfather, Roman Harjo (1924–2006) in 1954 at Clovis, New Mexico.

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Motorcycles of Native American Motorcycles have long been a…

Written by at December 22, 2014

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Motorcycles of Native American

Motorcycles have long been a symbol of America’s love for the road and free spirit. Harley Davidson is one of the most well-known and respected brands of motorcycle. But there is another company who makes beautiful, rugged bikes: Indian Motorcycles. The company was founded in North Carolina and is America’s oldest motorcycle brand. The Scout and the Chief were the two most popular models.

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A Win for Indian Country: Native Settlement Saved A new park…

Written by at December 22, 2014

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A Win for Indian Country: Native Settlement Saved

A new park being developed near Nashville will offer a rare look at ancient history.
The Nashville Metropolitan Council, the governing body for Tennessee’s capital city and surrounding towns, on December 16 acquired a 6.7-acre plot of earth that covers the area’s largest intact Mississippian village. The village, known as Kellytown, dates to the 1400s and was part of a massive civilization built along a natural sulfur spring.


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Keystone XL Founders and Costs Escalate, as Sen. McConnell Calls…

Written by at December 22, 2014

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Keystone XL Founders and Costs Escalate, as Sen. McConnell Calls It 2015 Priority

The battle over the Keystone XL pipeline is slated to heat up after the first of the year, but at the same time, economists are questioning whether it’s even worth building as oil prices drop, and President Barack Obama is saying that it will not benefit the U.S. so much as Canadian oil companies.

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