Yavapai History & Culture

Written by at January 26, 2015

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Our community was created by Executive Order on September 15, 1903. The 40-square mile reservation is now home to 600 community members

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Loren Bommelyn ~ Tolowa Loren Me’-lash-ne Bommelyn (born 1956)…

Written by at January 26, 2015

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Loren Bommelyn ~ Tolowa

Loren Me’-lash-ne Bommelyn (born 1956) is a tradition bearer for the Tolowa tribe. He has dedicated himself to preserving the traditional songs, language, and basketry. He is the foremost ceremonial leader of the tribe, and its most prolific basketweaver. Bommelyn is an enrolled member of the federally recognized Smith River Rancheria and was elected as their tribal secretary.

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 Chief Justice Earl Warren: A Christian Land, Governed by…

Written by at January 26, 2015

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 Chief Justice Earl Warren: A Christian Land, Governed by Christian Principles

In a previous column, I noted that U.S. federal Indian law is traced to the religio-political narrative of Chosen People and Promised Land in the biblical book of Genesis.
In this column I want to address the fact that 2015 marks the 60th year since the U.S. Supreme Court handed down its decision in Tee-Hit-Ton Indians v. United States under the leadership of Chief Justice Earl Warren.



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The Chehalis Tribe In the old days we gathered sacred roots and…

Written by at January 26, 2015

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The Chehalis Tribe

In the old days we gathered sacred roots and berries. We fished the Chehalis, Black, Cowlitz, Satsop, Wynoochee, Elk, Johns, Skookumchuck, and Newaukum rivers. Our people fished and hunted from the mountains, across the prairies, to Grays Harbor and in the lower Puget Sound. In the old days the baskets carried and stored our foods. We relied upon the baskets, the rivers, the land, the roots, the berries, the fish, and the animals. Our lives were tied together by the Creator.

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Carrie Bethel ~ Mono Lake Paiute – Kucadikadi Carrie McGowan…

Written by at January 26, 2015

Carrie Bethel ~ Mono Lake Paiute – Kucadikadi
Carrie McGowan…



Carrie Bethel ~ Mono Lake Paiute – Kucadikadi

Carrie McGowan Bethel (1898–1974) was a Mono Lake Paiute – Kucadikadi (Northern Paiute) basketmaker associated with Yosemite National Park. She was born Carrie McGowan in Lee Vining, California and began making baskets at the age of 12. She participated in basket making competitions in the Yosemite Indian Field Days in 1926 and 1929. She gave basket weaving demonstrations at the 1939 Golden Gate International Exposition

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The Goshute Tribe The Confederated Tribes of the Goshute…

Written by at January 26, 2015

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The Goshute Tribe

The Confederated Tribes of the Goshute Reservation (CTGR) is located approximately 70 miles south east of Wendover, Utah/Nevada via U.S. Highway 93A. Our reservation covers approximately 112,870 acres in White Pine County, Nevada as well as Juab and Tooele counties in Utah.
Our People We are descendants of the bands of Indians who settled in Eastern Nevada and Western Utah. The Shoshone-Goship people have always been an integral part of Western Utah and Northeastern Nevada.

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Annie Antone ~ Tohono O’odham Annie Antone (born 1955) is a…

Written by at January 26, 2015

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Annie Antone ~ Tohono O’odham

Annie Antone (born 1955) is a Native American Tohono O’odham basket weaver from Gila Bend, Arizona
Background Annie Antone was born in Tucson, Arizona in 1955. She learned how to weave baskets from her mother, Irene Antone. Annie began at the age of 19 and sold her first basket for $10. She gave the money to her mother. Currently she lives on the Gila Bend Reservation.

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Yakama Nation History Chief Spencer’s tribal name was “Tah pa…

Written by at January 26, 2015

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Yakama Nation History

Chief Spencer’s tribal name was “Tah pa shah” and interpreted to Sharp Shooter. He was Chief of the Klickitats and appointed at the original Yakama Agency in White Swan, Washington. He was confirmed by J.W. Nesmith, Superintendent of Indian Affairs for the Washington-Oregon Territory in 1856.
He was also appointed by U.S. officials since Chief Kamiakin refused to come onto the reservation. Chief Spencer was paid $500 per year and at the end of his appointment was given an officer’s sword.

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Princess Angeline ~ Duwamish Princess Angeline (circa 1820 – May…

Written by at January 26, 2015

Princess Angeline ~ Duwamish
Princess Angeline (circa 1820 – May…



Princess Angeline ~ Duwamish

Princess Angeline (circa 1820 – May 31, 1896), also known in Lushootseed as Kikisoblu, Kick-is-om-lo, or Wewick, was the eldest daughter of Chief Seattle.
Biography She was born around 1820 to Chief Seattle in what is now Rainier Beach in Seattle, Washington. She was named Angeline by Catherine Broshears Maynard, the second wife of Doc Maynard. The 1855 Treaty of Point Elliott required that all Duwamish Indians leave their land for reservations,

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History of the Coquille Indian Tribe The Coquille Indian Tribe…

Written by at January 26, 2015

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History of the Coquille Indian Tribe

The Coquille Indian Tribe was terminated in 1954. On June 28, 1989, the Coquilles regained their status as a federally recognized Indian tribe. After 35 years of “termination” and federal policy that denied their status as Indian people, Public Law 101-42 restored the Coquilles eligibility to participate in federal Indian programs and to receive federal funds for tribal education, health, and law enforcement programs.


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Sovereign Nation of the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana The…

Written by at January 26, 2015

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Sovereign Nation of the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana

The Sovereign Nation of the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana is a federally recognized Native American Tribe with approximately 865 members. The Coushatta people live primarily in Louisiana, with most living in Allen Parish, just north of the town of Elton, Louisiana, and east of Kinder, Louisiana. A small number share a reservation near Livingston, Texas with the members of the Alabama-Coushatta Tribe.

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Chipeta ~ Kiowa Apache Chipeta or White Singing Bird…

Written by at January 26, 2015

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Chipeta ~ Kiowa Apache

Chipeta or White Singing Bird (1843/4–1924), was a Native American woman, and the second wife of Chief Ouray of the Uncompahgre Ute tribe. Born a Kiowa Apache, she was raised by the Utes in what is now Conejos, Colorado. Advisor and confidant of her husband, Chipeta continued as a leader of her people after his death in 1880.

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The Language of Nixyáawii Language for the people of Nixyáawii,…

Written by at January 26, 2015

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The Language of Nixyáawii

Language for the people of Nixyáawii, the place of many springs, is a way of life and being. Within the phrases and words of our language is the history of our people and the strength and emotion of our tribal community.
By tapping into the knowledge of our fluent speakers, we are working to recapture our language for the benefit of generations to come. Our CTUIR Language Program is dedicated to recording fluent speakers,

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First Foods & Life Cycles Until the early 1900s, the culture…

Written by at January 26, 2015

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First Foods & Life Cycles

Until the early 1900s, the culture of the Cayuse, Umatilla and Walla Walla Indians was based on a yearly cycle of travel from hunting camps to fishing spots to celebration and trading camps and so on.
The three tribes spent most of their time in the area which is now northeastern Oregon and southeastern Washington.




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Martha Berry ~ Cherokee Martha Berry is a Cherokee beadwork…

Written by at January 26, 2015

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Martha Berry ~ Cherokee

Martha Berry is a Cherokee beadwork artist, who has been highly influential in reviving traditional Cherokee and Southeastern beadwork, particularly techniques from the pre-Removal period.
Background Martha Berry was born and raised in Tulsa, Oklahoma. She is a registered tribal citizen of the Cherokee Nation. Her grandmother and mother taught her how to sew and embroider at age five. She made her own clothes and became a professional seamstress.

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Shoni Schimmel ~ Umatilla Indian Reservation Shoni Schimmel…

Written by at January 26, 2015

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Shoni Schimmel ~ Umatilla Indian Reservation

Shoni Schimmel (born May 4, 1992) is a Native American professional basketball player. She was an All-American college player at the University of Louisville and a first round draft pick of the WNBA’s Atlanta Dream.
Early life and high school Schimmel, a 5’9″ point guard, first received notoriety as a high school player in Oregon. Raised on the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation in Mission, Oregon, she was the subject of a documentary by filmmaker Jonathan Hock called Off the Rez,

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 Caution! ‘American Sniper’ Is a Dangerous Movie  I…

Written by at January 26, 2015

 Caution! ‘American Sniper’ Is a Dangerous Movie
 I…



 Caution! ‘American Sniper’ Is a Dangerous Movie

 I was looking forward to seeing American Sniper. I took my brown Native high school-aged son to see it. I’m a fan of Clint Eastwood’s acting and directing, and his Sniper is a beautifully shot and directed action packed flick. But after his film, I spent the hour’s drive home explaining to my son why I thought the movie was dangerous and corrosive to the American people.


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Lyle Thompson Selected No. 1 in Major League Lacrosse Collegiate…

Written by at January 26, 2015

Lyle Thompson Selected No. 1 in Major League Lacrosse Collegiate…



Lyle Thompson Selected No. 1 in Major League Lacrosse Collegiate Draft

University of Albany standout Lyle Thompson was selected as the No. 1 overall pick in the Major League Lacrosse Collegiate draft. The pick was announced on Friday in Baltimore, Maryland.

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Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation…

Written by at January 26, 2015

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Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation is a federally recognized confederation of three Sahaptin-speaking Native American tribes who traditionally inhabited the Columbia River Plateau region: the Cayuse, Umatilla, and Walla Walla.
When the leaders of the Walla Walla, Cayuse, and Umatilla peoples signed the Treaty of Walla Walla with the United States in 1855, they ceded 6.4 million acres of homeland in what is now northeastern Oregon and southeastern Washington in exchange for a reservation and the promise of annuities in the form of goods and supplies.


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The Cayuse Tribe The Cayuse are a Native American tribe in the…

Written by at January 26, 2015

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The Cayuse Tribe

The Cayuse are a Native American tribe in the state of Oregon in the United States. The Cayuse tribe shares a reservation and government in northeastern Oregon with the Umatilla and the Walla Walla tribes as part of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation. The reservation is located near Pendleton, Oregon at the base of the Blue Mountains.

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Coast Miwok and Southern Pomo The Coast Miwok are from the areas…

Written by at January 26, 2015

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Coast Miwok and Southern Pomo

The Coast Miwok are from the areas of Novato, Marshall, Tomales, San Rafael. Petaluma and Bodega. The Southern Pomo people are from the Sebastopol area. Many of the Coast Miwok and Southern Pomo people still live within their ancestral territories.
The Southern Pomo were the first inhabitants of what is now the town of Sebastopol. The territorial lands of the Southern Pomo of Sebastopol is in Sonoma County south of the Russian River to the southern Santa Rosa area.

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Unlocking Digital Tools in Indian Country to Build a New…

Written by at January 26, 2015

Unlocking Digital Tools in Indian Country to Build a New…



Unlocking Digital Tools in Indian Country to Build a New Economy

It’s time for State of the Unions. President Barack Obama, of course, on Tuesday. Then, a variety of state reports across the country. And, on Thursday, Indian country’s national version, the State of Indian Nations. National Congress of American Indians President Brian Cladoosby spent about an hour talking about some of the challenges facing the more than five hundred tribal governments.

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Ho-Chunk Nation remains confident of off-reservation casino bid

Written by at January 26, 2015

The Bureau of Indian Affairs has been moving slowly on the project.

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Chukchansi Tribe comes together in hopes of reopening casino

Written by at January 26, 2015

The so-called unification council plans to submit an agreement to the National Indian Gaming Commission.

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Bois Forte Band reports six percent drop in revenues at casino

Written by at January 26, 2015

Chairman Kevin Leecy said non-gaming aspects of the facility continue to do well.

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