Native Student Publication Gets a Makeover

Written by at June 30, 2012

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A simmering caldron of confrontation between the University of Arizona’s American Indian Studies (AIS) program and Red Ink magazine—since 1989, believed to be one of the only student-run Native American magazines in the country—has finally boiled over. “The relationship between the American Indian Studies Department and Red Ink just couldn’t be mended,” said third-term managing editor Joseph A. Quintana, Santo Domingo Pueblo. “There was a disconnect, a ‘them-versus-us,’ and you could feel it. We tried hard to remain with the department, but they seemed to have made up their minds and further talks would have been futile, so in the…

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Tiger Woods Returns to Turning Stone for the Annual NB3 Foundation Challenge

Written by at June 30, 2012

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Oneida Indian Nation Representative Ray Halbritter and four-time PGA Tour winner Notah Begay III have confirmed the tournament date and playing field for the fifth annual Notah Begay III (NB3) Foundation Challenge. The world-class charity golf event will tee off on Wednesday, August 29 at Turning Stone Resort’s Atunyote Golf Club on Oneida Indian Nation lands near Verona, New York. The Challenge raises funds for Begay’s charity, which fights obesity and diabetes among Native American children. For the first time in the five-year history of the event, a new East meets West format will be used to pair the fiercely…

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Artifacts found at Phoenix construction site

Written by at June 30, 2012

PHOENIX (AP) – Archaeologists said they have found ancient artifacts at the Phoenix construction site of the Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office’s future headquarters.

The Arizona Republic reports preservation experts believe pottery fragments found by workers in May date as far back as 1,600 years ago.

Archaeologist Mark Hackbarth – whose firm, Logan Simpson Design, is contracted with the county to examine any findings – said the grindstones predate even the Hohokam Indians, a tribe that once lived where downtown Phoenix is today.

The fragments were likely from an era known as the Red Mountain Phase, Hackbarth said. “That’s because there’s no way to archaeologically say that’s a tribe at that time,” he told KPNX-TV last week.

The fragments will eventually go to the Pueblo Grand Museum for research and future exhibits. Laurene Montero, a city of Phoenix archaeologist at the museum, called the possible Red Mountain period artifacts an exciting discovery.

“It’s an early phase we don’t see too much of. There are only a handful of sites we’ve identified that date from roughly 1 to 300 A.D.,” Montero said. “When they find it, it’s pretty interesting.”

Maricopa County spokeswoman Cari Gerchick said Wednesday that allowing archaeologists to gather findings at the site at Sixth Avenue and Madison Street shouldn’t affect the construction deadline for the $93 million facility.

“There is work on it every day,” Gerchick said. “We don’t believe that it’s behind schedule in any way.”

A final report on the findings will come out in six months. David R. Abbott, associate professor of anthropology at Arizona State University’s School of Human Evolution and Social Change, said he is looking forward to reading the report. Abbott believes the artifacts could help archaeologists learn more about the Hohokam tribe’s way of life.

“We don’t know a lot about the Red Mountain Phase. Any additional information pertinent to what’s going on at that time would be of great value,” Abbott said.

The artifacts’ discovery means the county must pay $200,000 to Logan Simpson Design, Gerchick said. The firm was already retained for a $2,000 fee to stay on call if anything was found.

In May, workers at the site dug up remnants of graves that local experts said had ties to Arizona pioneers who died in the mid- to late-1800s. Their findings included coffin handles, wood slivers and even some human remains.

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Information from: The Arizona Republic, http://www.azcentral.com

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Lakota speakers looking to start immersion daycare

Written by at June 30, 2012

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) – Tama I’atala doesn’t want his children to feel as disconnected from their Lakota heritage as he does from his Samoan culture.

I’atala, who is part Lakota and lives on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, has a solution: Have his children, including his 17-month-old son, learn the language.

“I don’t want my kids to grow up without that sense of pride of who they are,” said I’atala, 36.

I’atala is part of a small group of people on the reservation trying to start a Lakota language-immersion daycare for infants in hopes of increasing the number of people fluent in the language and, ultimately, strengthening the Lakota culture.

There are fewer than 6,000 Lakota speakers – less than 14 percent of the Lakota population in North and South Dakota, and the average age of a Lakota speaker is 60.

Several other efforts are under way to preserve the Lakota language, but the daycare is unique because the children would be taught Lakota as the primary language. The hope is the children would feed into Lakota-first preschools and elementary schools.

“We think really the best way to approach immersion from Step 1 is to start with kids who are preverbal infants and can therefore learn Lakota as a first language,” Peter Hill said. Hill, originally from Philadelphia, moved to the reservation several years ago and learned Lakota. He has taught it at several area schools – and to his 2-year-old daughter.

“It seems that kids really see their first language as their default language, their home-base language. Even in a really successful immersion program where kids can become successful, it never quite has that centrality to them,” he said.

But Hill and the other daycare supporters are having trouble finding between $76,000 and $108,000 in grants and resources necessary to pay the salaries of two full-time Lakota-speaking caregivers, an administrator and miscellaneous expenses. With the economy still in recovery mode, many organizations are cutting back or not awarding new grants, Hill said.

On the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, which straddles the North Dakota-South Dakota border, a similar effort is under way. The Standing Sioux Rock Tribe received grants from the Administration of Native Americans to offer what is called an immersion nest. As many as 10 3-year-olds will take part in the program starting in September, said project director Sacheen Whitetail Cross.

One of the biggest hurdles in Lakota language immersion is finding qualified teachers, said Wilhelm K. Meya, executive director of the Lakota Language Consortium, a nonprofit organization trying to preserve and revitalize the language.

Immersion teachers are not only required to be fluent in the language but must also be able to convey their understanding and mastery of the language to students, he said.

The Lakota Language Education Action Program is trying to increase the number of teachers. It offers tuition, room and board to qualified language students at the University of South Dakota or Sitting Bull College on the Standing Rock reservation in Fort Yates, N.D.

Once completed, students are required to teach Lakota in a classroom for the same amount of time they received funding.

I’atala, who is currently enrolled in the LLEAP program at the University of South Dakota, said language efforts are key to keeping the Lakota culture strong.

“I think, personally, it starts with the language,” he said.

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Follow Kristi Eaton on Twitter at http://twitter.com/kristieaton.

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Nevadans learning to teach American Indian culture

Written by at June 30, 2012

CARSON CITY, Nev. (AP) – Teachers from across Nevada converged in the capital earlier in June to develop a system for teaching local American Indian culture in schools.

“Nevada history is incomplete without the Native American experience,” said Stacey Montooth, a member of the core team established through the Nevada Department of Education to create the curriculum.

While some teachers take the initiative to incorporate American Indian history into their lesson plans, experts say it is often incomplete and misinformed.

As a teacher in Clark County, Lynn Manning said she saw that first-hand.

“The teachers there knew nothing of the tribes of Nevada,” Manning said. “When they taught about Native people, much of it was outdated and stereotypical. It was totem poles and teepees in the same discussion.”

Now the Indian education coordinator for the Washoe County School District, Manning said she is excited about the curriculum being developed so teachers will be armed with the knowledge that can be nearly impossible to find in textbooks.

“Unless we provide it for them, they don’t even know where to find it,” Manning said. “This area is just full of living resources.”

Spearheaded by Fredina Drye-Romero, Indian education coordinator for the Nevada Department of Education, the curriculum will teach both the history and contemporary lifestyles of Nevada’s four main tribes: Northern Paiute, Southern Paiute, Washoe and Western Shoshone.

“We didn’t want to focus on just the history because we’re not gone,” Romero said. “We’re still here.”

That is one of the challenges in teaching the Native culture, Manning said, calling it the “unicorn concept.”

“People are inherently interested in Native people because we’re so romanticized on television, but our story often ends at about 1890,” she said. “What this will do, we hope, is bring us into the 21st Century and show that we continue to exist.”

About 25 teachers spent three days reviewing the history and culture of Nevada’s tribes, which were characterized as hunters and gatherers who followed food sources seasonally.

Teachers also visited displays at the Nevada State Museum and spent much of the day Thursday immersed in the culture at Stewart Indian School. In addition to learning the history of the Indian boarding school, they listened to historical accounts of local tribes, reviewed past and present federal Indian policy, and saw traditional arts and crafts.

“We’ve just bombarded our participants with as much information as they can take in about American Indians,” Montooth said. “Now, we’re using their expertise to figure out how to teach it to the standards.”

Romero said the curriculum should be available to Nevada’s teachers by next school year to be used as a resource. In the future, she said, she’d like to see it become a requirement.

“I would love to have this mandated,” she said, noting she didn’t learn about her own Paiute history until college.

The Carson High School graduate said it would have made a difference to have learned it earlier.

“I think I would have had more pride in where I came from,” she said. “I would have had a better understanding of why education was so important.”

Participants met with local tribal leaders during a traditional dinner consisting of beans and venison stew.

Wanda Batchelor, chairwoman of the Washoe Tribe, gave her blessing to the endeavor.

“We’re revisiting how we’re going to tell our story,” Batchelor said. “And it’s going to be from us. It’s going to be from our elders. We’re awakening our language, our song and our dance.”

Montooth said it will not only fill in historical gaps, but will also pique the students’ interest.

“It’s the greatest story on Earth,” she said.

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Information from: Nevada Appeal, http://www.nevadaappeal.com

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Exit Realty Offers $2,000 Bursary To Aboriginal Real Estate Students

Written by at June 30, 2012

Eligible Aboriginal and Native American students who have an interest in Real Estate Studies for their post secondary education are invited to apply for an annual $2,000 bursary award offered by Exit Realty. Applications must be submitted by September 15th, 2012.

Toronto, Canada, June 25, 2012 – Exit Realty of Toronto offers an annual bursary of $2,000 to Aboriginal and Native American students participating in Real Estate Studies for their post secondary education. Students wishing to apply must meet specific criteria and must visit Exit Realty’s website to obtain and submit the bursary application form by September 15th, 2012.

Exit Realty owner, Gregory D’Atri, has been actively involved in the Toronto real estate market for more than 30 years. Mr. D’Atri stated,

“Participation in the real estate market, ownership of investment real estate and land development are synonymous with stability, personal net worth, the creation of employment and community well-being. My goal is to support enhanced participation by Aboriginal and Native American community members in the real estate market. A positive outcome of this will be empowering them to assist other tribal members in achieving home ownership.”

Bursary applicants must meet the following criteria:

1) Applicant must be a registered Indian with a valid status card. In Canada, applicants must have a Secure Certificate of Indian Status (SCIS). In the United States, applicants must obtain a Certificate of Degree of Indian or Alaska Native blood (CDIB) card to prove American Native status.

2) Applicant must be taking one real estate-oriented course for the next semester. This can include, but is not limited to, Real Estate Law, Finance, Development and Property Management.

3) Applicant must be 24 years of age or less at the time of application.

4) Bursary winner must agree to have his or her name, photo and post secondary institution displayed on the Exit Realty website.

To obtain an application and complete submission details, applicants must visit the Exit Realty website and apply by September 15th, 2012.

Exit Realty
Owner, Gregory D’Atri
http://www.realestatelicense.ca
Phone: 416-259-1147

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Jun 30, The Nine Ojibwe Core Values Retold in – The Good Path – Native News Network

Written by at June 30, 2012

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American Indians had a long tradition of passing their history and teachings through storytelling. Within Ojibwe teachings, there are nine core values passed down through generations by elders

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Jun 30, Photo of the Week – Candlelight Vigil – June 30 – Native News Network

Written by at June 30, 2012

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Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe This photograph was taken on Thursday night at the candlelight vigil held in the parking lot of the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigans Tribal Operations

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Jun 30, Family of Carnel Chamberlain Wants More Answers – Native News Network

Written by at June 30, 2012

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ISABELLA INDIAN RESERVATION The ex boyfriend of Carnel Chamberlains mother, Anthony M. Bennett, was in the United States Federal Court on Friday charged with assault

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Jun 30, Supreme Court – Indian Health Care Improvement Act – Native News Network

Written by at June 30, 2012

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WASHINGTON Thursdays US Supreme Court decision on the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act was the most significant decision since the high court decided the 2000 presidential election

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Jun 30, In the Midst of Tragedy – There is the Power of Prayer – Native News Network

Written by at June 30, 2012

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Any death at a young age is tragic. A murder of a four year old will shake the core of a persons constitution. This is what the Chamberlain and Francis families are dealing with now

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Susquehanna River, Ancestral Home of the Susquehannock, Receives Historic Designation

Written by at June 29, 2012

Katie Faull, a Bucknell University professor of German and humanities, wasn’t expecting this result when a student asked what she knew about early Moravian missionaries along the Susquehanna River, but after six years Faull’s work to find and translate 18th century mission diaries that detail relationships between missionaries and Native American peoples in the area, has led to the river getting a federal designation as part of the Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail. “This marks an important moment in the history of the Susquehanna River and the communities that have lived along its banks for thousands of years,”…

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Jun 29, Leonard Peltier on Anniversary of Incident at Oglala – Native News Network

Written by at June 29, 2012

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COLEMAN FEDERAL PENTITENARY Leonard Peltier has been incarcerated as the result of a shootout incident between American Indian Movement members and Federal police agents in Oglala 37 years ago

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Jun 29, Karuk Tribe Happy with Moratorium to Stop River Mining – Native News Network

Written by at June 29, 2012

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SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA Most of the Karuk Tribes aboriginal territory has never been set aside as tribal land. It is managed by the US Forest Service

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Native News Update June 29, 2012

Written by at June 29, 2012

Another Native News Update with anchor Kimberlie Acosta from the studios of IndianCountryTV.com.

This weekend's stories: Mobile Grocery launches in San…

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Jun 29, Native Arts Market at Trickster Gallery This Weekend – Native News Network

Written by at June 29, 2012

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CHICAGO If you will be in the Chicago area this weekend, the Trickster Gallery is hosting a Native Arts Market on Saturday, June 30 and Sunday, July 1

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Jun 29, Fire Restriction Order in Place on Navajo Indian Reservation – NativeNewsNetwork

Written by at June 29, 2012

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WINDOW ROCK, ARIZONA Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly reminds people that the Navajo Nation is still under the executive order of fire restriction

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Jun 29, Community Shows Strength After 4 Year Old's Body Found – Native News Network

Written by at June 29, 2012

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ISABELLA INDIAN RESERVATION Hundreds of Saginaw Chippewa people stood in support of the family of 4 year old Carnel Chamberlain last evening at a candlelight vigil

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Jun 29, Boyfriend Arrested – 4 Year Old Carnel Chamberlain – Native News Network

Written by at June 29, 2012

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ISABELLA INDIAN RESERVATION Tribal officials await confirmation after a body, believed to be 4 year old Carnel Chamberlain was discovered. Native News Network is on the scene to confirm the reports

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Court affirms Osage Nation’s immunity in casino insurance case

Written by at June 29, 2012

The Osage Nation can’t be sued in state court by a casino employee due to sovereign immunity, the Oklahoma Supreme Court ruled on Wednesday. An employee of the Osage Million Dollar Elm Casino fell and…

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Mayor cites Kialegee casino in going after Indian fireworks stand

Written by at June 29, 2012

The mayor of Tulsa, Oklahoma, sent authorities to a fireworks stand on an Indian allotment, claiming he wants to avoid disputes like the one over the Kialegee Tribal Town casino. The city lacks jurisdiction over…

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Menominee Nation welcomes progress on off-reservation casino

Written by at June 29, 2012

The Menominee Nation of Wisconsin is seeing progress on its long-delayed off-reservation casino. After more than eight years of work, the Bureau of Indian Affairs has issued the final environmental impact statement for the project….

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Charles Kader: Overdue decision on tobacco seizure in New York

Written by at June 29, 2012

“On June 18, 2012, in a New York courtroom, in picturesque St. Lawrence County, a decision was reached in a…

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American Indian Cultural Center in Oklahoma runs out of money

Written by at June 29, 2012

The American Indian Cultural Center and Museum in Oklahoma City has run out of money. Construction of the half-built facility…

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Sen. Tester: Taking better care of our Native American veterans

Written by at June 29, 2012

Montana is home to more than 5,000 Native American veterans. The percentage of Indian people who serve America’s military is…

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