Jim Thorpe #NativePride #ThrowBackThursday

Written by at February 28, 2013

Jim Thorpe #NativePride #ThrowBackThursday

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Navajo Wars – Mexican period Melgares’s successor, Governor José…

Written by at February 28, 2013

Navajo Wars – Mexican period

Melgares’s successor, Governor José Antonio Vizcarra met Navajo leaders at Paguate on 12 February 1823. His terms essentially stated that the Spanish would settle the Navajos in pueblos and energetically convert them to the Catholic religion. The Navajos were not interested in either of these proposals. They rejected the treaty and renewed the fight. Six New Mexicans were killed at Socorro in April and eight more at Sabinal in May. On 18 June 1823, Vizcarra led 1,500 troops in a 74-day expedition against the Navajos of western New Mexico. His route took him through the Chuska Mountains to the Hopi mesas in what is now Arizona, then north towards Utah, reaching Oljeto Creek in what is now San Juan County, Utah. Thirty three Navajos were killed, of whom eight were women, and about 30 were captured. The expedition reached Canyon de Chelly in what is now eastern Arizona.

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The Patuxet

Written by at February 28, 2013

The Patuxet are an extinct Native American band of the Wampanoag tribal confederation. They lived primarily in and around the area of what has since been settled as Plymouth, Massachusetts.

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Tommy Wildcat – Cherokee/Creek/Natchez

Written by at February 28, 2013

Tommy Wildcat (born May 3, 1967) is a Native American Cultural Promoter, flutist, historical storyteller, lecturer, and traditionalist. He is a fullblood Native American of Cherokee ancestry.

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Louis Riel – Métis Riel, Louis (lwē rēĕlˈ), 1844–85, Canadian…

Written by at February 28, 2013

Louis Riel – Métis

Riel, Louis (lwē rēĕlˈ), 1844–85, Canadian insurgent, leader of two rebellions, b. Manitoba, of French and métis parentage. In 1869–70 he led the rebels of the Red River settlements, mainly métis and indigenous peoples, who felt that their rights were threatened by the transfer (1869) of the Hudson’s Bay Company territory to Canada. When the government dispatched (1870) troops to face the rebels, the Red River Rebellion collapsed, and Riel fled the country. In that year, under the Manitoba Act, the Red River settlements were accorded a provincial government. Riel returned to Canada and was elected to the House of Commons, but was expelled (1874) and declared an outlaw (1875). In 1884 he returned to lead a group of indigenous people and métis who were bent on securing titles to their lands in Saskatchewan. The uprising ended with an engagement (1885) at Batoche.

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Squanto – Pawtuxet

Written by at February 28, 2013

Tisquantum (January 1, 1585 – November 30, 1622), also known as Squanto, was the Native American who assisted the Pilgrims after their first winter in the New World and was integral to their survival.

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Feb 28, House of Representatives Passes VAWA -Tribal Provisions Intact-NativeNewsNetwork

Written by at February 28, 2013

WASHINGTON The US House of Representatives on Thursday passed the Senates version to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act. The Act passed the House on a

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Navajo Wars – American period The U.S. military assumed nominal…

Written by at February 28, 2013

Navajo Wars – American period

The U.S. military assumed nominal control of the southwest from Mexico by 1846. Military and civilian records show that civilians continued their raids into Navajo lands. Likewise, Navajo raided these same civilians. Slavery, the Civil War and civilian militias complicated the U.S. military response to the Navajo until the mid-1860s, which culminated in the Long Walk. native art, native american jewelry, native american rings, turquoise crafts, student loans, debt financing, native american astrology, native horoscopes, student debt, Indian Genealogy Records, family tree, native heritage, native jobs, native study, native students, native american university, grant Timeline

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The Wanapum Tribe

Written by at February 28, 2013

The Wanapum tribe of Native Americans formerly lived along the Columbia River from above Priest Rapids down to the mouth of the Snake River in what is now the US state of Washington.

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Andrew Vasquez – Apache

Written by at February 28, 2013

Andrew Vasquez is a Native American flute player of the Apache tribe. He has released four albums to date, Vasquez, the award winning Wind River, V3: An American Indian, and Togo, all released by Makoché Records.

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Robbie Robertson – Mohawk Robbie Robertson, OC (born Jaime…

Written by at February 28, 2013

Robbie Robertson – Mohawk

Robbie Robertson, OC (born Jaime Robert Klegerman; July 5, 1943) is a Canadian singer-songwriter and guitarist. He is best known for his work as lead guitarist and primary lyricist within The Band. He was ranked 59th in Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time. The Band has been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the Canadian Music Hall of Fame. As a songwriter, Robertson is credited for such classics as “The Weight”, “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down”, “Up On Cripple Creek”, “Broken Arrow” and “Somewhere Down the Crazy River”, and has been inducted into the Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame.

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Smohalla – Wanapun

Written by at February 28, 2013

Smohalla (Dreamer) (c. 1815 – 1895) Wanapum nineteenth-century dreamer-prophet associated with the Dreamers movement among Native American people in the Pacific Northwest’s Columbia Plateau region.

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Mary Youngblood – Aleut/Seminole Mary Youngblood Mary Youngblood…

Written by at February 28, 2013

Mary Youngblood – Aleut/Seminole

Mary Youngblood Mary Youngblood (raised as Mary Edwards) is a Northern California Native American flutist. She is half Aleut, and half Seminole. Youngblood was born in Sacramento, California. She has been awarded three Native American Music Awards, being the first woman to win “Flutist of the Year,” which she won in both 1999 and 2000, as well as winning “Best Female Artist” in 2000. She is also the first Native American woman to have received a Grammy Award for “Best Native American Music Album”, and the first Native American person to have won two Grammy’s, the first for Beneath the Raven Moon in 2002 and Dance with the Wind in 2006.

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Apache Pass – Fort Bowie (1862) Located in forbidding Apache…

Written by at February 28, 2013

Apache Pass – Fort Bowie (1862)

Located in forbidding Apache Pass, a landmark on the Overland Stage road, Fort Bowie played a significant role in the wars with the Chiracahua Apache. Here in February 1861, even before the fort was established, Lieutenant George Bascom faced Cochise in a dramatic confrontation that touched off a quarter-century of bloody hostilities between the Chiricahua and white invaders, and a personal ten-year war between Cochise and the U.S. Army. General James H. Carleton, leading a Federal army eastward in 1862 to head off the Confederate invasion of New Mexico, founded Fort Bowie, and fought for two days, July 15th and 16th, a battle with the Apaches for control of the nearby Apache Springs.

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John Two Hawks – Lakota

Written by at February 28, 2013

John Two Hawks – Lakota

John Two-Hawks is a musician who has been performing professionally in live concerts since the early 1990s. He sings and plays many instruments, but is best known as a pioneer and virtuoso player of the Native American flute.

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Jay Silverheels – Mohawk

Written by at February 28, 2013

Jay Silverheels – Mohawk

Jay Silverheels (May 26, 1912 – March 5, 1980) was a Canadian Mohawk First Nations actor.

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Fort Bowie National Historic Site Located in the southeast…

Written by at February 28, 2013

Fort Bowie National Historic Site

Located in the southeast corner of Arizona, Fort Bowie National Historic Site commemorates the story of the bitter conflict between the Chiricahua Apache and the United States military, as well as standing as a lasting monument to the bravery and endurance of U.S. soldiers in paving the way for westward settlement and the taming of the western frontier.

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Republicans Cave on Violence Against Women Act; Is the…

Written by at February 28, 2013

Republicans Cave on Violence Against Women Act; Is the Sequester Next?

This is not a headline that any political party wants to read: “House GOP Caves: Violence Against Women Act Impasse Finally Broken.” The shape of a new deal is simple, according to Talking Points Memo. “The Rules Committee instead sent the House GOP’s version of the Violence Against Women Act to the floor with a key caveat: if that legislation fails, then the Senate-passed version will get an up-or-down vote.”

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A Violence Against Women Act Surprise? House Might Pass Tribal…

Written by at February 28, 2013

A Violence Against Women Act Surprise? House Might Pass Tribal Provisions

Indian affairs law and lobby officials nationwide are mobilizing at the news that the House Republican leadership may soon consider an up or down vote on S.47, the Senate version of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) that includes provisions that would allow tribal courts to prosecute non-Indians who commit crimes against Indian women and families on Indian lands.

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Feb 28, Native Currents – Remembering Wounded Knee 40 Years Ago – Native News Network

Written by at February 28, 2013

Forty years before the Idle No More peace movement, there was the American Indian Movement. Just as the Idle No More Movement has in recent months instilled

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New York Bridge Renovation Could Unearth Native…

Written by at February 28, 2013

New York Bridge Renovation Could Unearth Native Artifacts

Historians and archaeologists are predicting that Native American artifacts could be found along Newtown Creek during the renovation of the Kosciuszko Bridge that connects Queens and Brooklyn in New York City.

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Jay Red Eagle – Cherokee

Written by at February 28, 2013

Jay Red Eagle is a Native American flautist and Native American artist whose businesses include lines of music clothing called Nashville Threads and M.T. Medicine Bottle.

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Samoset – Algonquin

Written by at February 28, 2013

Samoset (ca. 1590–1653) was the first Native American to make contact with the Pilgrims.

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R. Carlos Nakai on Pow Wow Music You’ll find lots of…

Written by at February 28, 2013

R. Carlos Nakai on Pow Wow Music

You’ll find lots of pageantry and colorful regalia at a pow wow — but from one participant’s perspective, it’s sound that puts the ‘wow’ in pow wow. Of course, that opinion is a bit biased because it comes from an internationally-known musician: R. Carlos Nakai, the world’s premier performer of the Native American flute. Of Navajo-Ute heritage, Nakai has been a music maker for three decades, and has 35 albums and 2 gold records to his credit. Simply put, Nakai — as performer, composer, and listener — knows music and its power.

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8 Questions For American Indian Society’s Inaugural…

Written by at February 28, 2013

8 Questions For American Indian Society’s Inaugural Powwow Master of Ceremonies, E. Keith Colston

In 2013, the American Indian Society (AIS) celebrated another successful Inaugural Powwow and Ball in celebration of the re-inauguration of President Barack Obama. This was the 12th Inaugural event for the AIS who marched in the inaugural parade of President Nixon and has celebrated every inauguration since watching the powwow grow into a successful event on a busy weekend every four years.

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